Quality Arabic Translations

Quality Arabic Translations

To communicate clearly and accurately in Arabic, you need high-quality accredited linguists looking after your content, after all – your reputation is at stake

 

Whether you are looking for Quality Arabic Translations for something technical, legal or medical, or simply a letter, we can help you.

We will equip you with knowledge and methods, enabling you to communicate in the correct written form of Arabic, so can reach your target audience with ease and confidence and receive Quality Arabic Translations.

We offer a professional Arabic to English and English to Arabic language translation service. Here is some information which you will find useful as the Arabic language is full of interesting facts and essential tips when  you are looking to communicate effectively in Arabic speaking countries.

Tailored Language Strategy (for you)

We work alongside you to work out a strategy which will simplify and clarify the translation process entirely. Transparency is key.

We work out exactly what you need by gathering information from our Project Brief, and then propose how it can be achieved using a formula that works every time.

We always take into consideration the style, tone, register of the content but more importantly (yet often forgotten), the audience.

Think of it this way, you want the readers to understand your content and the content have the desired affect such as:
to inform, excite, educate etc.

Nothing is left to chance and we ask you the right questions so you don’t have to

We'll Show You How It's Done

 We understand that even though you will be an expert in your industry, you probably aren’t one in ours. Well, that is fine and that’s what we are here for.   We simply need to understand what you are trying to achieve, who you are trying to reach and why. We then will work alongside you and make it happen.

We will match you with the very best in-country specialists that suit your business or brand and work alongside you to ensure that your audience understands exactly what you want them to. It may not be rocket science but when translation is carried out properly, you really see the benefits – quickly.

 

Varieties of Arabic

There are two forms of Arabic recognised today: Classical (or Quranic) Arabic and Modern Standard Arabic.

Classical Arabic is the language of the Quran and ancient literary texts. For this reason it is seen as sacred. It is fairly similar to Modern Standard Arabic but has certain stylistic and grammatical divergences.

Developed from Classical Arabic, Modern Standard Arabic is the official Arabic language and one of the six languages of the United Nations. It is used in the writing of literature, journalism, correspondence and street signs. It is the language taught in schools, and as it is standardised it is the same across the Arab world. Spoken MSA is the language used on television, in government and on official occasions.

Classical Arabic evolved into the Modern Standard used today for a variety of reasons, but mostly, as the name suggests, from a need to modernise. Scholars looking to express an influx of alien ideas and concepts, the spread of education creating a need for a standardised version of Arabic to teach and more recently the spread of the media have all contributed to modernising Arabic into what it is today.

Dialects of Arabic

There are two forms of Arabic recognised today:

Whereas Modern Standard Arabic is the formal literary standard that is used throughout the Arab world, there are a huge number of spoken dialects (colloquial Arabic) that vary from region to region and country to country.

Early Arabs were nomads and this helped to spread and cement Arabic in many different regions of the Arabic speaking world. As these new regions began to adopt Islam and read the Quran, they slowly started speaking Arabic. The Arabic that they spoke changed and mutated, often adopting characteristics from their former languages, leading to a large variety of dialects of Arabic, all of which differ from each other in a multitude of ways. Many of these dialects diverge so considerably from Modern Standard Arabic that they can be unintelligible to one another. They are much more different to one another than the various dialects of French, English and German, for example, to such an extent that some claim that there is scope to refer to them as different languages, rather than dialects.

 

These dialects are so widely used that most people in Arabic speaking countries do not speak Modern Standard Arabic at all. They can read and understand it, as it is the language of public communication, but do not use it themselves. Arabic dialects are much more flexible and susceptible to modernisation than Modern Standard Arabic, and often make use of English and French loan words. Because they are used in more colloquial settings, dialects of Arabic also make much more use of slang. Some of the major groups of Arabic dialect are categorised as follows:

 

Egyptian Arabic – this is spoken in Egypt and around 20% of all Arabic speakers speak Egyptian Arabic

 

Maghrebi Arabic – this is spoken in Moroco, Algeria, Libya and Tunisia. It frequently borrows words from French (in Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia) and Italian (in Libya and Tunisia) due to their history as French colonies. For example, the word forchita (fork), comes from the French word fourchette in Moroccan Arabic.

 

Gulf Arabic – this is spoken in Persian Gulf countries like Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and United Arab Emirates.

 

Sudanese Arabic – this is spoken in Sudan and has influences from local African languages.

 

Levantine Arabic – this is spoken in the Levant region, i.e. in Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Palestine and Israel. It can be broken up into two major varieties, South and North Levantine.

 

Difficulties for Arab Translators

 

Because Arabic language and culture differs so greatly from English, translating between the two languages can present a multitude of problems for even the most experienced translator. Here is a by no means exhaustive list of just a few of the difficulties that Arabic translators experience:

 

As the Arabic script is read from right to left, and this will affect the page design, formatting and layout of most documents. This means that Arabic desktop publishing (DTP) is more costly and time consuming and really does require the expertise of seasoned professionals. For example, charts showing your company’s profits will need to be flipped around unless you want people to think that your business is losing money! We at Planet Veritas understand that these seemingly small details can mean a great deal in terms of how your translation is received, which is why we provide experts in multilingual DTP to ensure that your marketing materials or company presentation is effectively and appropriately laid out in Arabic.

 

The lack of scientific and technical writing originally written in Arabic means that there are no standard Arabic terms for many terms and concepts in English. Due to this lack of terminology, these terms are often transliterated, meaning that there is often no standard translation of new terms in Arabic. However, projects such as the www.arabterm.org technical dictionary are working towards providing standardised glossaries of terminology in areas such as automotive engineering, transport and infrastructure and renewable energies, among others.

 

English and Arabic are spoken by countries that have considerable cultural, religious and social differences. Concepts that are completely acceptable in one culture can be considered bizarre or completely unacceptable in the other, or they can simply not exist at all in the target culture. Accurately translating cultural concepts can be a minefield for an Arabic translator. For example, iddah [العدة‎] is the period of mourning that a women must observe after the death of her spouse or a divorce, during which she cannot remarry. She must wear plain clothes and wear no makeup or perfume. This concept, which took two lines of English text to explain is encompassed in one word in Arabic.

 

Although much writing and public speech is in Modern Standard Arabic, most spoken situations and some literature is written using dialects of Arabic, which are heavily influenced by regional culture and identity. Translators and interpreters trying to translate from these dialects into English can find themselves at a loss trying to render the uniqueness of these dialects.

 

Likewise, translating from English into a specific dialect must be considered depending on the target audience. This is why you can’t just get a document “translated into Arabic”, because if you got a document translated into Maghrebi Arabic when it is intended for audiences who speak Egyptian Arabic, the target audience may not be able to understand the text. This is why the linguistic expertise of an experienced language services provider such as Planet Veritas is essential to ensure that your document is completely tailored to your target audience.

 

Our Arabic Translators are Based In-Country

Our Quality Arabic Translators are based in-country so they are always up to date with the latest language terminology, nuances and language changes – otherwise your content may sound old fashioned and simply not be good enough.

For example, if you are in need of an Arabic medical translation into German – our translator would be based in Germany and a medical expert. The same goes for Legal,  Marketing, Technical… etc.   If you need a more colloquial language, then the translator would be native from that area, such as Egyption, UAE or Moroccan Arabic.

We will match you with the very best Quality Arabic Translation specialists that suit your business or brand and work alongside you to ensure that your audience understands exactly what you want them to. It may not be rocket science but when translation is carried out properly, you really see the benefits – quickly.

 

 

Quality Arabic Translations

We are one of the first translation companies to be awarded the latest International Standards for our Industry. What does that mean to you? We know what we are doing!

We are Internationally Accredited not only for the ISO2008:2015 but also the ISO17100:20015 (Translation).

We are so confident you will love our services, we guarantee they meet your expectations and wherever we can, we exceed them – we love happy customers.

Interesting Facts about Arabic

There are two forms of Arabic recognised today:

Whereas Modern Standard Arabic is the formal literary standard that is used throughout the Arab world, there are a huge number of spoken dialects (colloquial Arabic) that vary from region to region and country to country.

Early Arabs were nomads and this helped to spread and cement Arabic in many different regions of the Arabic speaking world. As these new regions began to adopt Islam and read the Quran, they slowly started speaking Arabic. The Arabic that they spoke changed and mutated, often adopting characteristics from their former languages, leading to a large variety of dialects of Arabic, all of which differ from each other in a multitude of ways. Many of these dialects diverge so considerably from Modern Standard Arabic that they can be unintelligible to one another. They are much more different to one another than the various dialects of French, English and German, for example, to such an extent that some claim that there is scope to refer to them as different languages, rather than dialects.

 

These dialects are so widely used that most people in Arabic speaking countries do not speak Modern Standard Arabic at all. They can read and understand it, as it is the language of public communication, but do not use it themselves. Arabic dialects are much more flexible and susceptible to modernisation than Modern Standard Arabic, and often make use of English and French loan words. Because they are used in more colloquial settings, dialects of Arabic also make much more use of slang. Some of the major groups of Arabic dialect are categorised as follows:

 

Egyptian Arabic – this is spoken in Egypt and around 20% of all Arabic speakers speak Egyptian Arabic

 

Maghrebi Arabic – this is spoken in Moroco, Algeria, Libya and Tunisia. It frequently borrows words from French (in Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia) and Italian (in Libya and Tunisia) due to their history as French colonies. For example, the word forchita (fork), comes from the French word fourchette in Moroccan Arabic.

 

Gulf Arabic – this is spoken in Persian Gulf countries like Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and United Arab Emirates.

 

Sudanese Arabic – this is spoken in Sudan and has influences from local African languages.

 

Levantine Arabic – this is spoken in the Levant region, i.e. in Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Palestine and Israel. It can be broken up into two major varieties, South and North Levantine.

 

Difficulties for Arab Translators

 

Because Arabic language and culture differs so greatly from English, translating between the two languages can present a multitude of problems for even the most experienced translator. Here is a by no means exhaustive list of just a few of the difficulties that Arabic translators experience:

 

As the Arabic script is read from right to left, and this will affect the page design, formatting and layout of most documents. This means that Arabic desktop publishing (DTP) is more costly and time consuming and really does require the expertise of seasoned professionals. For example, charts showing your company’s profits will need to be flipped around unless you want people to think that your business is losing money! We at Planet Veritas understand that these seemingly small details can mean a great deal in terms of how your translation is received, which is why we provide experts in multilingual DTP to ensure that your marketing materials or company presentation is effectively and appropriately laid out in Arabic.

 

The lack of scientific and technical writing originally written in Arabic means that there are no standard Arabic terms for many terms and concepts in English. Due to this lack of terminology, these terms are often transliterated, meaning that there is often no standard translation of new terms in Arabic. However, projects such as the www.arabterm.org technical dictionary are working towards providing standardised glossaries of terminology in areas such as automotive engineering, transport and infrastructure and renewable energies, among others.

 

English and Arabic are spoken by countries that have considerable cultural, religious and social differences. Concepts that are completely acceptable in one culture can be considered bizarre or completely unacceptable in the other, or they can simply not exist at all in the target culture. Accurately translating cultural concepts can be a minefield for an Arabic translator. For example, iddah [العدة‎] is the period of mourning that a women must observe after the death of her spouse or a divorce, during which she cannot remarry. She must wear plain clothes and wear no makeup or perfume. This concept, which took two lines of English text to explain is encompassed in one word in Arabic.

 

Although much writing and public speech is in Modern Standard Arabic, most spoken situations and some literature is written using dialects of Arabic, which are heavily influenced by regional culture and identity. Translators and interpreters trying to translate from these dialects into English can find themselves at a loss trying to render the uniqueness of these dialects.

 

Likewise, translating from English into a specific dialect must be considered depending on the target audience. This is why you can’t just get a document “translated into Arabic”, because if you got a document translated into Maghrebi Arabic when it is intended for audiences who speak Egyptian Arabic, the target audience may not be able to understand the text. This is why the linguistic expertise of an experienced language services provider such as Planet Veritas is essential to ensure that your document is completely tailored to your target audience.

 

 

Clients of our Quality Arabic Translations are: 

Montagne Jeunesse, a beauty company specialising in ethical products
United States Institute of Peace, which works to prevent, mitigate and resolve violent conflict around the world
Mitie Business Services, a strategic outsourcing and energy services specialist
United Welsh, a housing association providing affordable properties to rent

 

Quality Arabic Translations
Quality Arabic Translations